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Besides, I’m telling you – Writing Practice: Conjunctions of Addition

Any idea why you use words like: and, also, too, next, besides, first (second, etc.), further, furthermore, in addition, in the first place and moreover?

The above words are conjunctions. You use them to introduce to your reader that you’re going to add more information.

You can use most of these words at different places in your sentence, so in that sense they’re nice and easy. There are some exceptions:

You put “too” at the end of a sentence.

Here is an example:

Johan is coming to the party, and Marvin is, too.

You can put “also” on the end of the sentence, too, but only Americans do that.

Here is an example:

Johan is coming to the party, and Marvin is, also.

Otherwise, “also” is found in the middle of a sentence.

Example:

John is coming to the party, and also Marvin is coming.

Or:

John is coming to the party, and Marvin is also coming.

The other conjunctions will more typically come at the beginning of the sentence.

doctor

Now I’ll give an example or two of each conjunction, and after that you can make your own sentences in an exercise.

And

connects two things or facts:

Jane is a nurse and Beatrice is a doctor.

Next

introduces something that follows or comes later:

First, the Duke of Marlborough entered the room. Next, the Earl of Sandwich and his wife entered.

Or you could write it also with “next” at the end:

The Earl of Sandwich and his wife entered next.

Besides, further, furthermore, in addition and moreover

They all mean that something is added:

There are two lemon trees in the garden. Besides, there are some strawberry beds.

There are two lemon trees in the garden. Further, there are some strawberry beds.

There are two lemon trees in the garden. Furthermore, there are some strawberry beds.

There are two lemon trees in the garden. In addition, there are some strawberry beds.

There are two lemon trees in the garden. Moreover, there are some strawberry beds.

You may put “besides” at the end of the sentence:

There are two lemon trees in the garden and some strawberry beds besides.

“In addition” can also be put at the end of the sentence:

There are two lemon trees in the garden and some strawberry beds in addition.

First (second, etc.) and in the first place (in the second place, etc.)

are used to add information in a certain order:

First, he put his music stand in the right place. Second, he placed the score on it. Third, he tuned his violin for about fifty minutes.

We don’t go to the theatre often. In the first place, we live too far from the city. Second, we’re couch potatoes who like to watch TV.

Important note: if you place these conjunctions at the beginning of your sentence, you should put a comma (,) after them. Have a look again at the examples above.

Exercise

Put the two sentences in the right order, and use the conjunction in brackets ().

The first one has been done for you.

  1. One more manager was recruited this week. Last week two new team leaders have been recruited. (in addition)

Last week two new team leaders have been recruited. In addition, one more manager was recruited this week.

  1. It’s hard to find an inexpensive hotel at the beach. The beach is always crowded. (moreover)
  2. The pupils complain that you are cruel. We don’t need you in our school. Your methods of teaching arithmetic are strange and ineffective. (first, second)
  3. I plan to stay in Florence on my next trip to Italy. I will visit Rome, Sienna, Pisa and Venice, all in the same week! (furthermore)
  4. You’re a good friend. You can keep a secret. You’re fun to be with. (in the first place, in the second place)
  5. Prepare the dough for the cake. Mix the tofu with the sugar, chocolate chips, cocoa powder and blackberries. (next)
  6. He knows five languages. Kenny has four years of experience in an international environment. (besides)
  7. I think the red dress suits you better. It’s warmer, which is good as the evenings are getting chilly. (also)
  8. Nick is his brother. Andrew is my classmate. (and)

You can find the answers at the bottom of this page.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Answers: 

  1. It’s hard to find an inexpensive hotel at the beach. Moreover, the beach is always crowded.
  2. First, your methods of teaching arithmetic are strange and ineffective. Second, the pupils complain that you are cruel. We don’t need you in our school.
  3. I plan to stay in Florence on my next trip to Italy. Furthermore, I will visit Rome, Sienna, Pisa and Venice, all in the same week!
  4. In the first place, you’re fun to be with. In the second place, you can keep a secret. You’re a good friend.
  5. Prepare the dough for the cake. Next, mix the tofu with the sugar, chocolate chips, cocoa powder and blackberries.
  6. Kenny has four years of experience in an international environment. Besides, he knows five languages. Or: He knows five languages besides.
  7. I think the red dress suits you better. Also it’s warmer, which is good as the evenings are getting chilly. Or: It’s also warmer, which is good as the evenings are getting chilly. Or: It’s also warmer, which is good as the evenings are getting chilly. Or: It’s warmer also, which is good as the evenings are getting chilly.
  8. Andrew is my classmate and Nick is his brother.

3 thoughts on “Besides, I’m telling you – Writing Practice: Conjunctions of Addition

  1. My English is so poor , there fore i have not covered easily any course ,but your course
    and example so easy I learn more about you.

    Like

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